Call for Papers

The Forty-Third Annual Sewanee Medieval Colloquium

March 10-11, 2017

The University of the South, Sewanee, TN

 

Theme: Borders and Margins

 

Brinley Rhys Memorial Lecture:        Elaine Treharne, Stanford University

Edward King Plenary Lecture:          Marina Rustow, Princeton University

School of Theology Lecture:             Marilyn McCord Adams, Rutgers University

 

The Sewanee Medieval Colloquium invites papers engaging with the space of the margin and the border in all aspects of medieval cultures. This includes the form and arrangement of manuscripts, the framing of visual art, the production of textiles and other materials, the contestation of political boundaries, non-normative sexualities and genders, demarcation of religious identity, conceptions of race, differences of species, frontiers of exploration and travel, and peripheral social groups, and other ways of conceptualizing our theme. Papers should be twenty minutes in length, and commentary is traditionally provided for each paper presented. We invite papers from all disciplines, and encourage contributions from medievalists working on any geographic area. A seminar, directed by Emily Steiner (University of Pennsylvania), will also seek contributions; please look for its separate CFP soon. Participants in the Colloquium are limited to holders of a Ph.D. and those currently in a Ph.D. program.

A separate call for sub-themes will appear later in April. 

Please submit an abstract (approx. 250 words) and brief c.v., via our website, no later than 14 October 2016. If you wish to propose a session, please submit abstracts and vitae for all participants in the session. Completed papers, including notes, will be due no later than 10 February 2017.

 

For more information, contact:

Dr. Matthew W. Irvin
Director, Sewanee Medieval Colloquium
medievalcolloquium@sewanee.edu

 

Seminar: Defining Nature

Kellie Robertson, Associate Professor of English at the University of Maryland, will lead a seminar at the 2016 Colloquium on the topic, "Defining Nature." The seminar will allow scholars to work together to engage scientific, literary, historical, and visual ways of exploring the natural world. Medievalists from all fields are encouraged to apply. A full description appears after the jump. 

Dr. Robertson is currently completing Nature Speaks: Medieval Literature and Aristotelian Natural Philosophy (forthcoming from University of Pennsylvania Press). 

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